Reflections from the Food Intensive

Amelia Nebenzahl, Global Thinking Teacher
Thursday, October 1, 2015

Last week was Woolman’s Food Intensive, one of two week-long field trips where students engage in hands-on learning from people working in the field (in this case quite literally) on issues we study in classes. From a one-woman farm, to urban school gardens, a feed lot, a mostly female run organic distribution center, or day labor center, we interacted with a wide variety of components of our food systems. Rarely do we take time to think about where our food comes from and what it took to get it into our bodies. The Food Intensive sheds light not only on much of this process, but also how food systems, can be seen from different sides. Here are a few student reflections of multiple perspectives explored on the Food Intensive:

“Two different perspectives I saw were from the guy in charge at the university feedlot and Molly from Fruit of the Loam. The guy in charge at the university feedlot believed that feeding the cows corn was perfectly safe and nutritious; that feeding corn mixed with other nutrients was a less expensive and efficient alternative to grazing. On the contrary, Molly openly spoke on how cows were being fed corn, which they aren’t even able to digest and cannot get proper nutrients from, and how they weren’t being able to move about and graze, fattened to the point in which they become quite weak and confined to a small space until the time for slaughter arises. Additionally, the view on road kill by the naturalist we met in the park was quite interesting; he believed that eating road kill was more respectful to the animal whose life was accidentally taken. Rather than let it’s carcass rot and the animal’s life be a waste, he could use that animal to sustain himself in many ways. That was definitely something that I did not even think about, much less consider, so it was a shock to my perspective on food systems.”       -Victory Amos-Nwankwo

“A time on the food intensive trip where I saw two sides of a story related to food systems was the Oakland Leaf school farming program and Riverhill farm. At the elementary school I observed how they taught the kids how to garden and how important it is. They focused on making sure the kids had the skills to do this, like knowing how to compost properly. They even taught them how to make herbal medicine, which I love! However, I feel like they were mainly focused on how wonderful and useful farming is and they were not as focused on how it can be very difficult. When we went to Riverhill farm I learned the other side to the story of small farms. I learned how it can be very challenging. There are many things that affect the success of farms. The weather is unpredictable but farming is greatly affected by this. At Riverhill farm we learned that they work from four in the morning to six in the evening every single day. It is hard to make a living by working on a small farm. This side of the story made me feel more appreciative about the food I get from these places and it made me want to buy local in order to support all these hard workers. It was interesting to visit both these places because even though they were so alike in many ways I also learned about very different things.”        -Sophia Mueller

 

Check out a few snapshots from the trip!

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