Interns in the Garden!

Brianna Beyrooty, Staff, Farm Apprentice
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Interns play an integral part in the garden. They spend 10+ hours in the garden a week doing everything from seed starting to pruning an entire orchard.  Intern garden time is a great way to bond over hard work and see something transform with their efforts every week.

Monday mornings start with a garden check-in, starting with silence interns share thoughts to start the week with. This is a way unique and effective way to ease into the week with a clear mind and heart.  With the intern’s hard work and dedication the garden gets the attention and love it deserves.

Here are some of the intern’s thoughts on working in the garden:

Joe- I like pruning and being in the trees in the orchard. I like not killing, but invigorating the tree to grow. I think I’m good with the ladder and enjoy the aggressive ladder work. 

Em-What I love most about working in the garden is the opportunity to be outside. Nothing makes me more jolly than the California sun! I’m also quite fond of whispering encouraging words to our growing plant babies and chasing away hungry quails.

 

Gio- Our farm manager Maggie McProud is my favorite thing about the garden! Granted, she isn't a plant, but she does support the interns as we grow as farmers and people. She is closely seconded by harvesting cherry tomatoes, pruning apple trees, and planting garlic.  It was harvest season when we first arrived at Woolman, so understandably we were easily enchanted by the incredible amount of produce that was picked and consumed every day. At one point, at the end of the peak season, we harvested over five hundred pounds of produce in one day (four hundred of which were tomatoes). 

Kat with weeds

Kat- Having never grown food before, working with the garden this year has given me a deep and visceral appreciation for cycles of life and the radical act that is taking that process into your own hands and belly. I love knowing that the sweat off my own back is a gesture of resistance against industrial agricultural practices that harm our planet, bodies and communities. I also love knowing that the greens and tomatoes on my plate haven’t been shipped from hundreds or thousands of miles away and that their growth contributed to and not detracted from the health of the soil. I’m grateful to be understanding these cyclical processes of life and death, so essential to our basic existence, not in a textbook but through hands-on experience with a brilliant teacher like Maggie McProud leading the way.

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